PERFORMANCES OF TIGER SHRIMP CULTURE IN ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PONDS

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dc.contributor en-US
dc.creator Ahmad, Taufik; Research Institute for Coastal Fisheries
dc.creator Tjaronge, M.; Research Institute for Coastal Fisheries
dc.creator Suryati, E.; Research Institute for Coastal Fisheries
dc.date 2016-10-25
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-02T01:18:12Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-02T01:18:12Z
dc.date.issued 2016-10-25
dc.identifier http://ejurnal.litbang.pertanian.go.id/index.php/ijas/article/view/661
dc.identifier 10.21082/ijas.v4n2.2003.p48-55
dc.identifier.uri http://repository.pertanian.go.id/handle/123456789/88
dc.description Mangrove ecosystem plays an obvious role in maintaining the biological balance in the coastal environment where shrimp ponds are usually constructed. The removal of mangroves around shrimp ponds has frequently brought about harvest failure. The study evaluated the performance of tiger shrimp culture in ponds provided with water from a water body where there was mangrove vegetation (hereafter mangrove reservoir). Twelve ponds, each measuring 2,500 m2, were filled with seawater from the mangrove reservoir until the water depth of 100 cm and then stocked with 20-40 PL/m2. In the first six ponds, the bottom water was released into the reservoir when the water depth reached 140 cm and then the water depth was maintained at 100 cm. In the second six ponds, the water was released from the ponds until the water depth reached 60 cm and then refilled with reservoir water until a depth of 100 cm. Both treatment ponds received water from the reservoir which also received the wastewater. The feeds for the shrimps were broadcast into the ponds twice a day to meet the 3% shrimp biomass requirement, which adjusted every other week through sampling. The result showed that mangrove  vegetation is capable of removing excessive nutrients, up to 70% for NO3- N and NH4 +-N, reducing PO4 =-P fluctuation, and producing bioactive  compounds. In the second treatment ponds, shrimp mortality started to occur in day 28 and most died by day 54 after stocking due to white spot disease outbreak. Mass mortality took place 54 days after stocking in two out of six of the first treatment ponds. en-US
dc.format application/pdf
dc.language eng
dc.publisher Indonesian Agency for Agricultural Research and Development en-US
dc.relation http://ejurnal.litbang.pertanian.go.id/index.php/ijas/article/view/661/446
dc.source 2354-8509
dc.source 1411-982X
dc.source Indonesian Journal of Agricultural Science; Vol 4, No 2 (2003): October 2003; 48-55 en-US
dc.title PERFORMANCES OF TIGER SHRIMP CULTURE IN ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PONDS en-US
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.type Peer-reviewed Article en-US


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